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However, the porcelain collector should note that early Coal Brook Dale marks are extremely rare and very collectible.

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The Coalport porcelain manufactory was a market leading pottery throughout the 1800s, it produced a staggering range of porcelain products of all shapes and types.

Seemingly Coalport was named Coalport because of the coal that was transferred from canal boats to river vessels in the Coalbrook Dale area. Very early Coalport porcelain was unmarked, (c1805 and before) and in reality marks were rarely used before 1820.

Porcelain wares bearing a red painted ‘COALBROOKDALE’ mark in upper case are extremely rare and highly collectible. Most are found on colourful floral encrusted porcelain wares. From June 1820 to c1830, a series of prominent printed ‘Society of Arts’ marks were placed on Coalport porcelain wares. They may also include the words ‘ English Porcelain ‘.

c1810 to 1825, rare examples of Coalport porcelain is marked in underglaze blue, ‘Coalbrookdale’, ‘CD’ or ‘C. c1815 to 1825, some Coalport plates and dishes include impressed numerals. c1845 to 1855, Coalport produced many Sevres & Chelsea porcelain imitations that can often include copies of the original Sevres or Chelsea marks.

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